20 Apr

How To Write An Elevator Pitch For Prospective Clients That Is Clear & Concise

Man and woman working on their elevator pitch for their therapy practice.

A well-crafted elevator pitch is one of the most important tools every business owner needs. Having one will allow you to quickly answer the question, “what do you do for a living?” in a way that is easy for you to say and informative to the person who asked the question.

When done right, elevator pitches are not only the short speeches you offer to clients or prospective partners, but they also serve as a tool to help focus your marketing efforts around.

Think about that.

When you know exactly who your clients are, you don’t have to waste time guessing what their needs are or why they need to read the copy, articles or ads you’re writing.

Developing a strong pitch will allow you to eliminate wasted time writing on topics that don’t lead clients to your services. It will also help reduce the number of people visiting your website or clicking your ads who are not really looking to purchase your products.

Given how busy we all are, it makes great sense to have a strong focus on your exact client match so that all of your marketing touches the right people, and doesn’t waste the time of people who are not really interested in or serious about getting help.

Below is an 8 step guide for creating your written elevator pitch.

When written out, it should be less than 300 words and should take less than 90 seconds to speak out loud. Once you have it written out, you want to begin practicing it out loud. Stand in front of a mirror or speak your pitch into the microphone on your phone so you can hear it back. Memorize it as closely as you can so the next time someone asks you “what do you do for a living?” you’ll have a confident answer that helps to further the conversation.

  1. Write one or two sentences about who you are. For example, “I am a couples counselor, specializing in helping couples recover from affairs and avoid divorce.” Or “I am a nutritionist specializing in helping clients deal with heart disease and diabetes.”
  2. Write one or two sentences explaining how you help people. For example, “I meet with couples face-to-face over the course of several months to help discover what caused the rift in their marriage.” OR, “I see clients virtually over zoom to explore their eating habits and help them begin regular meal planning that meets their new dietary requirements.”
  3. Write one or two sentences that explain why you’re the best person to help them. Marketers often refer to this as your USP or “unique selling proposition”. This is the part of your elevator pitch that differentiates you from every other person in the field who does the same kind of work you do. In other words, it explains why you’re special, unique and qualified to do your work in a way that others are not. For example, “I have worked with couples for over 25 years and use a combination of the Gottman and PACT interventions. This allows us to quickly get to the core challenge that led to the affair. It also helps the couple to bond again in a healthy way with the focus on increasing awareness around their unique bond and commitment to staying together in the future.”Or, “I often work with clients after they have had some kind of cardiac event or received a new diagnosis that requires a change in their lifestyle. Our goal is to help them stop eating large quantities of foods like meat or sugar, and replace those foods with healthier choices that still taste good but offer a better shot at a longer, high-quality life.”
  4. Write one or two sentences that describe who you’re an ideal fit for. This is the place where you target your ideal client and declare who is the best match for your services. For example, “Couples who have recently unearthed an affair often benefit greatly from this work because it allows them to gain a holistic perspective on what happened and why. Then, by mutually taking responsibility for the health of the marriage, they can work on creating a happier marriage in the future.”Or, “Clients who are ready to make health changes because of a new diagnosis or because they are tired of feeling bad, benefit greatly from working with me. Together, we identify the foods and lifestyle needs that will make the client happiest. We also explore the different choices they need to make about food to have the life the most desire.”
  5. Write one or two sentences to conclude your thoughts and invite questions or requests to explore further. This is the part of the elevator pitch where you want to bring the listener in if they want to talk more about your work. If the pitch is written out, it’s a great place to offer a link to learn more about working together. If you’re saying it out loud, ideally, you want to leave the listener space to think about how your work relates to their life and invite in any questions they may have. For example, “I tend to keep a fairly full case-load but always have room for a few more clients. Many times, clients come to therapy in crisis, but the goal is to help them exit feeling safe, fulfilled and with a plan in place for the future.”Or, “I’m lucky that I can work with clients at really any stage of health around eating. Sometimes, clients come in really concerned about their overall health and longevity. Other clients are really just looking to create a shift in their wellness and I work with both.”
  6. Finally, put it all together for review.“I am a couples counselor, specializing in helping couples recover from affairs and avoid divorce. I meet with couples face-to-face over the course of several months to help discover what caused the rift in their marriage. I have worked with couples for over 25 years and use a combination of the Gottman and PACT interventions. This allows us to quickly get to the core challenge that led to the affair. It also helps the couple to bond again in a healthy way with the focus on increasing awareness around their unique bond and commitment to staying together in the future. Couples who have recently unearthed an affair often benefit greatly from this work because it allows them to gain a holistic perspective on what happened and why. Then, by mutually taking responsibility for the health of the marriage, they can work on creating a happier marriage in the future. I tend to keep a fairly full case-load but always have room for a few more clients. Many times, clients come to therapy in crisis, but the goal is to help them exit feeling safe, fulfilled and with a plan in place for the future.”AND

    “I am a nutritionist specializing in helping clients deal with heart disease and diabetes. I see clients virtually over zoom to explore their eating habits and help them begin regular meal planning that meets their new dietary requirements.I often work with clients after they have had some kind of cardiac event or received a new diagnosis that requires a change in their lifestyle.

    Our goal is to help them stop eating large quantities of foods like meat or sugar, and replace those foods with healthier choices that still taste good but offer a better shot at a longer, high-quality life. Clients who are ready to make health changes because of a new diagnosis or because they are tired of feeling bad, benefit greatly from working with me. Together, we identify the foods and lifestyle needs that will make the client happiest.

    We also explore the different choices they need to make about food to have the life the most desire. I’m lucky that I can work with clients at really any stage of health around eating. Sometimes, clients come in really concerned about their overall health and longevity. Other clients are really just looking to create a shift in their wellness and I work with both.”

  7. After reviewing it, ask yourself what’s missing? Fill in any gaps and remember the point is to keep it SHORT. By adding in every extraneous service you offer, you’ll never make it through the entire elevator pitch without losing the attention of the listener.
  8. Update as needed. If you add in a new training or service that is really a newly important part of your practice, that needs to be added in. But, don’t lose sleep over worrying that your pitch is perfect. Ideally, it’s your fast take on the work you do that helps to quickly convey but not bore the listener.

Writing a great elevator pitch is a task that we all need to do so we can covey simply and concisely the work we do. It’s never meant to minimize the depth of what you’re capable of doing with a client, but rather to be a great opener to a new conversation. Keep it positive and review it often.

As you work on your pitch, remember that perfection is never the goal. Honestly and clarity are.

Happy writing. And if you need help, please reach out. We offer a free consultation with our team to explore your ongoing business needs.